The Top 9 Allergenic Foods To Introduce Into Baby’s Diet by 12 Months

Updated: Aug 9


Starting solids with your baby is a really exciting milestone, but it can also be nerve-wracking, especially when it comes to foods that commonly cause allergies. Food allergies in children have always been a hot topic. And keeping up with the latest food allergy recommendations can seem daunting, as new research (sometimes contradicting old research) continues to emerge.


You have probably always heard that it is best to wait until kiddos are 1, 2 or even 3 years old to give them foods like peanut butter or eggs in order to avoid food allergies. Lately, however, it seems that everyone, including your pediatrician, is recommending the very opposite. In essence, you should expose your baby to the most common causing allergy foods early so you can help reduce their risk for allergies. So what changed?


Read this post to the end to learn what has caused this complete flip in the recommendations for introducing potentially allergenic food into a child’s diet. Plus, discover the top 9 allergy causing foods that are now recommended for early introduction within the first year of life to reduce the risk of food allergies.



DISCLAIMER: Each child has their own development timeline and specific needs. The content below is general information and for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional one-on-one advice. You are responsible for supervising your child’s health and for evaluating the appropriateness of the information below for your child. Please consult your healthcare provider regarding support or advice for your child's well being and health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen here.


Previous vs. Current Recommendations

Up until recently (2017 to be precise), the official recommendation was to wait up to three years to introduce common food allergens. That recommendation has changed, though. The general consensus today is to introduce these foods as soon as your baby starts eating solid foods (between 4-6 months of age).


So what changed?

Since 2015, several groundbreaking studies have been showing strong evidence that early introduction of food allergens—particularly egg and peanut—may prevent allergies to those foods from developing later in life.


This doesn’t work with all children, as there are other factors involved with the development of food allergies. However, in these studies the chances of developing food allergies were reduced by 80% when food allergens were introduced early as part of a balanced diet.


Despite this growing evidence, few babies are being exposed to enough allergens in the first year. So to help you take a proactive approach in protecting your tiny human from food allergies later in life, here’s a list of the top 9 allergy causing foods that are now recommended for early introduction within the first year of life.



>>Download the FREE Quick-Start Guide to Solids to learn WHEN, HOW, and WHAT to feed your baby when starting solids.



Top #1 Allergenic Food: Peanuts

Peanut allergies are among the top three allergies affecting young children (along with egg and milk.) Compared to other food allergies, peanut allergies are more likely to cause a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis. And while it was previously believed that an allergy to peanuts was lifelong, research has shown up to 20 percent of individuals with a peanut allergy eventually outgrow it.


Baby Z, 6 months old, eating peanut butter
Baby Z, 6 months, eating peanut butter

In their new consensus report, three leading allergy organizations --- the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI); and the CSACI (Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology) --- recommend introducing peanuts to babies around 6 months of age, but not before 4 months.





Top #2 Allergenic Food: Milk and Dairy

12 months baby eating yogurt with hands on high chair
Baby Charlotte, 12 months, eating yogurt

Cow’s milk is known to be good for your health and good for bone strength. It’s also one of the most common food allergens, particularly in infants and young children. Most children “outgrow” their milk allergy, but this sometimes occurs as late as their teenage years.


Most babies can begin consuming dairy foods around 6 months of age — after a few first solid foods have been introduced. Plain, whole-fat or whole Greek yogurt is a good first form of cow's milk protein for babies to try. Avoid the added sugar commonly found in yogurt marketed to babies and toddlers. You may start offering cow’s milk or other alternatives by using them in cooking, but, before 12 months of age, it shouldn’t be offered as a main drink to replace either breast or formula milk. For more on milk for babies and toddlers, please read our linked post.


In their new consensus report, three leading allergy organizations --- the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI); and the CSACI (Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology) --- recommend introducing common food allergens, such as dairy, to babies around 6 months of age, but not before 4 months.


Top #3 Allergenic Food: Egg

Egg allergy is one of the allergies with the greatest impact on a child’s quality of life, because so many foods contain hidden egg ingredients. Foods like pasta, mayonnaise, and even ice cream sometimes contain eggs.


Many children may eventually outgrow their egg allergy, but some children will not outgrow their egg allergy until their teenage years, and some egg allergies remain lifelong.


6 months old latino baby eating eggs for breakfast, baby led weaning
Baby Z, 6 months, eating eggs for breakfast

In their new consensus report, three leading allergy organizations --- the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI); and the CSACI (Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology) --- recommend introducing eggs to babies around 6 months of age, but not before 4 months.









​You can give your baby a safe start to solid foods! This on-demand workshop will provide you with the knowledge and confidence you need to wean well.



Top #4 Allergenic Food: Tree Nuts

The six most common tree nut allergies (for children and adults) are allergies to walnut, almond, hazelnut, pecan, cashew and pistachio. Tree nut allergies are one of the food allergy types most likely to cause severe reactions (along with peanut allergies). The allergy is usually lifelong. Only around 9% of children outgrow their tree nut allergy.

6 months old latino baby eating almond butter on a spoon
Baby Z, 7 months, eating almond butter

Someone with a tree nut allergy could have an allergy to several types of tree nuts. However, just because a person has an allergy to one tree nut doesn't mean that they have to avoid all types of tree nuts. The best way to clear up confusion and manage tree nut allergy is to see an allergist.