BANANA | 6 mos+ |🥇🌈

Updated: Aug 31


Bananas are well known for their potassium content, but they also contain other key nutrients for baby’s growth and development. Plus, bananas provide three natural sources of sugar – sucrose, fructose, and glucose – and are more dense in calories than most other fruits, making them an extremely efficient and sustainable source of instant energy for your growing baby.


DISCLAIMER: Each child has their own development timeline and specific needs. The content below is general information and for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional one-on-one advice. You are responsible for supervising your child’s health and for evaluating the appropriateness of the information below for your child. Please consult your healthcare provider regarding support or advice for your child's well being and health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen here.


Contents

1.When can I give bananas to my baby?

2. Is banana a healthy food for babies?

3. Is banana a safe food for babies?

4. Is banana a choking hazard for babies?

5. Is banana a top food allergen for babies?

6. How to buy bananas for babies

6.1. Which bananas should I feed my baby?

6.2. When are bananas in season?

7. How to store bananas

8. How to prepare and offer bananas to babies

8.1. Purees

8.2. Finger food 6 to 9 months old

8.3. Finger food 9 to 12 months old

8.4. Finger food 12+ months old

9. Banana meal ideas for babies

10. Recipes


When can I give bananas to my baby?

Babies can eat bananas as soon as they are ready to start eating solid foods, which is usually when they are around 6 months of age and have met all the readiness signs for solids, unless otherwise advised by your baby's healthcare provider. This creamy fruit is not only delicious but easy to prepare, too. A great choice for baby’s first food!


Fun Fact: Today, the banana is considered the fourth most valuable food crop on the planet behind wheat, rice, and milk, and is often hailed as the perfect food because it is one of the world's most accessible, nutritious, convenient, affordable crops grown year-round.


​You can give your baby a safe start to solid foods! This on-demand workshop will provide you with the knowledge and confidence you need to wean well.


Is banana a healthy food for babies?

Bananas are well known for their potassium content, but they also offer a healthy boost of vitamin B, vitamin C, folate, fiber, and magnesium. They contain three natural sources of sugar – sucrose, fructose, and glucose – and are more dense in calories than most other fruits, making them an extremely efficient and sustainable source of instant energy for your growing baby.


They are low in sodium and high in potassium, which helps to maintain the electrolytic balance of the body. The calcium and potassium in bananas also play a major role in a baby’s bone development.


Bananas are known to help protect against stomach ulcers and ulcer damage. The reason for this seldom known and almost odd fact is that bananas contain “mucilaginous bulking substances,” They help the intestines with producing a mucousy lining and are very, very easy to digest.


In addition, ripe bananas contain pectin, a soluble fiber that ‘keeps things moving’ through the digestive system and prevents constipation (do bear in mind, though, that unripe bananas often have the opposite effect and can cause constipation). Pectin is a prebiotic fiber, which feeds the “good” bacteria in your baby’s gut and helps build a healthy digestive system.


If your baby is recovering from a nasty bout of diarrhea, bananas can be useful in replacing the lost electrolytes.



Is banana a safe food for babies?

Bananas are not known for containing common food safety hazards. They may contain pesticides on the jacket. Although banana jackets are a wonderful source of fiber, they are usually not consumed by most people. As with any other fruit or vegetable, remember to wash the outside part (jacket or peel) well before offering it to your baby. See “How to prepare and offer” section for more information.



Is banana a choking hazard for babies?

Bananas are not listed on CDC's list of most common choking hazards for babies. The best way to avoid choking is by always being present when your baby eats. See section “How to prepare and offer” for more information on how to safely offer bananas to your baby.

​This workshop covers everything you need to know for dealing with gagging, reducing the risk of choking during mealtimes, and offering safe food sizes and shapes to your child.


Note: Keep in mind that any food can present a risk for choking if not prepared correctly. You are responsible for following age and food modification guidelines provided in order to reduce your baby’s risk for choking.

Is banana a top food allergen for babies?

Banana allergy is not common and rarely reported in infants. However, some babies may develop a reaction to bananas. There are two types of allergic reaction to bananas.

One is related to an allergy to latex – therefore you should discuss the introduction of bananas with your doctor if your child has a known latex allergy. You will probably be advised to avoid bananas altogether for now.


The second type of allergic reaction to bananas is related to pollen allergies and is known as oral allergy syndrome. The symptoms – which appear quickly – usually involve swelling or itching in the throat or mouth.


Bananas contain a protein called ‘chitinase.’ Your baby’s immune system may develop an allergic reaction after consuming this protein. Sometimes vasoactive amines also trigger a reaction. These are substances similar to histamines that occur in bananas naturally.


Whenever you give your baby bananas (or other foods) for the first time, offer it in small quantities, and watch for any signs of a reaction. If your baby seems to tolerate the food well and you see no adverse reaction, then continue to gradually increase portion sizes when you offer it again to your baby. If your baby shows any symptoms like diarrhea, skin hives, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, swelling of mouth, weakness, or dizziness after the consumption of bananas, consult your healthcare provider. These symptoms can be a sign of banana allergy or intolerance.


Note: Always consult with your healthcare provider regarding introducing solid foods to your baby, and specifically discuss any foods that may pose allergy risks for your baby.


How to buy banana for babies

For quick eating, choose bright yellow-colored bananas that are uniformly colored and have no blemish on the peel. These types of bananas are fully ripe. Fully ripe bananas are better for baby, as they contain more antioxidants than under-ripe fruit.

Avoid buying bananas that have brown patches on the surface. It shows the overripeness of the banana.


Don’t buy very green bananas unless you are willing to wait for them to ripen for a few days. You can, however, hasten the process by placing them in a paper or plastic bag – this ‘traps’ the ethylene gas that they naturally produce, making them ripen even faster


Which bananas should I feed my baby?

Now this is a valid question, considering the fact that there are so many different varieties of bananas around the world! A general rule is that the fruit that grows in your region is probably what will work best for your baby. There are different varieties of bananas that are out there that you might like to try. There are red ones and small yellow ones, and they can have wonderful flavors. Give them a try!


When are bananas in season?